Assembled Papers

New Scope for the Right to Communicate

Author: 
Cocca

Direct broadcast satellites and the right of man to communicate

Author: 
Jean d'Arcy

Technological Evolution and the Right to Communicate: The Implications for Electronic Democracy

Author: 
William J. McIver, Jr. and William F. Birdsall
Year: 
2002
Source: 
Paper presented at Euricom Colliquium: Electronic Networks and Democracy Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 9-12 October 2002
Abstract: 
The authors examine the co-evolution of information/communication technologies and communication rights, with emphasis on the right to communicate. They focus attention on several communication modalities and the related social and organizational developments, including: bi-directional, interpersonal communication telephony; unidirectional mass media; and the bi-directional, many-to-many communication supported by the newer broadband technologies. In this context, they describe three generations of human rights: civil and political rights; economic, social and cultural rights; and the emerging collective rights, as exemplified by the right to communicate.

Languge Rights in a Plural Society

Author: 
Lachman M. Khubchandani
Year: 
1997
Source: 
Guest Lecture at Indian Institute of Advanced Study
Abstract: 
The Indian concept of kshetra 'field, region' views the issues of heritage and rights of speech communities in a pluralistic framework, highlighting the characteristics of shifting language boundaries and identities, and the underlying communication ethos in the South Asian region. The paper critically reviews the phenomena of language Rights being essentially cultural, fulfilling the human urge of gratification to a particular heritage. It questions the present-day thrust on defining language rights in political terms, and instead pleads for generating an awareness among speech communities to articulate these communication rights on a broader canvas transcending political and bureaucratic institutions.

COMMUNICATION  ETHOS

Citizens at the Crossroads: The Right to Communicate

Author: 
William J. Birdsall and Merrilee Rasmussen
Year: 
2000
Source: 
Government Information in Canada/Information gouvernementale au Canada, No. 20.
Abstract: 
The authors note that Instant World issued in 1971 by the Canadian Telecommission was the first major document on the right to communicate. They then proceed to examine the current policy and consultative processes in Canada and find that today the public has too little say in these processes. They advocate greater citizen participation, especially in shaping policy for the information highway. Toward these ends, they propose that the right to communicate be included in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Introduction

Human Rights, Participatory Communication and Cultural Freedom

Author: 
Jan Servaes
Year: 
1998
Source: 
Human Rights and Participatory in Global Perspective Videaz Virtual Conference, June 1998
Abstract: 
Three generations of human rights are evident: the civil or freedom rights; the economic and social rights; and, currently, the solidarity or collective rights, including cultural rights. The principle of the right to communicate contains both the passive and the active right of the receiver to inform and to be informed. That the right to communicate is a fundamental human right clearly signals that participatory democratization brings a redistribution of power. Both individual and social rights are included in this right. Thus, there is an urgent need for a global ethics that begins from a global cultural perspective.

Future Trend of Telecommunication and the Right to Communicate

Author: 
Pekka Tarjanne
Year: 
1997
Abstract: 
The revolution in communication and information technology will have profound implications for all of those involved in the creation, production and dissemination of information, whether they are involved in scientific research, education, cultural, entertainment or commercial pursuits. On the one hand, this revolution will put at their disposal powerful new creative tools and means of reaching their audiences, whether they are local or global. On the other hand, this revolution raises new issues related to the ownership, control, diversity and flows of information. If all of these visions materialize, it is certainly the case that every aspect of life will be transformed. This, in a few words, summarizes the consensus that I see emerging around the world on the communication networks and services of the future. It is an inspiring vision. The question is, how can we realize it?

I am very pleased to be back in Indonesia, not only because of the natural beauty of your country and your traditional hospitality, but also because of the example Indonesia sets in what can be achieved if there is common commitment - between the State, the banks and private firms - to improving the level of telecommunication networks and services.  Indonesia has recognized that successful national development and telecommunications are linked and that if it is to attain its ambitious goal of status as a Newly Industrializing Country (N

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