Invited Papers

Communication: Needs Supplies and Rights

Author: 
Dan J. Wedemeyer
Year: 
200X
Source: 
Invited paper prepared for www.righttocommunicate.org
Abstract: 
There are many ways to come at the right to communicate. This methodology is based upon the premise that rights might be taken for granted if needs are in balance. Examples may include access to means of communication, if supplies meet needs few raise the "rights" issue. The methodology put forth is web-based and is capable of harnessing opinions of levels of needs, supplies and rights. This can be done for any time frame, past present and in the future. The Futures Forecasting Engine (FFE) creates/captures data, calculates the differences between needs and supplies and multiplies by the level of the right. It then rank orders the largest differences and sets out an "action urgency index" (AUI).

Introduction

 

While the basis for setting out the policies for the right to communicate have been both crisis driven and in limited instances anticipatory, the methods for exploring the imbalances have largely been qualitative and culturally, politically and philosophically anecdotal. They have been limited to past or, at best, present observations. Little has been done to systematically assess present or to project future imbalances or inequities. A new framework and methodology may be necessary. It is the intent of this paper to provide both.

Right to Communicate: Are Old Dilemmas Still Valid?

Author: 
Jerzy M. Pomorski
Year: 
2002
Source: 
Invited paper prepared for www.righttocommunicate.org
Abstract: 
I am definitely sceptical as to the idea of the Right to Communicate as a new human right. Such was my opinion in 1975 when I was invited to a discussion by Edward Ploman, and it has remained the same, although a lot has changed in this respect. If I were to identify the source of my scepticism, it would boil down to the fear of introducing a single global legal principle which homogeneously normalises a very complicated sphere of human relationships. Such dealings involve double danger: either the law will not be respected or the human relationships will suffer.

1. Introduction - a sceptic's view on a changing situation.  

I am definitely sceptical as to the idea of the Right to Communicate as a new human right. Such was my opinion in 1975 when I was invited to a discussion by Edward Ploman, and it has remained the same, although a lot has changed in this respect.  

The Global Village Green and the Right to Communicate in India

Author: 
Ravi K. Dhar
Year: 
2002
Source: 
Invited paper prepared for www.righttocommunicate.org
Abstract: 
This paper attempts to analyze the significance of the right to communicate as a basic human right and the factors that deprive the vast majority of Indians of this right on the 'global village green'. The study reveals that while liberalization and globalization have aggravated the communicational inequality between the developed and the developing countries, the denial of access to the new communication media tends to stifle popular participation in public debate. The incorporation of such a right as a fundamental right of the citizens would make it justifiable and ensure the citizens' participation in the public sphere for democratic deliberation.

The French Revolution was a watershed in the political history of mankind. It spawned in its wake a number of democracies, not only in the developed countries of the world but also in the Third World countries. Underpinning the wave of democratization was the hope that it would empower people as against an elite ruling class of 'barons'. While this hope was realized to a great extent in the developed West, it was not in the so-called developing East.

Identity, Culture and the Right to Communicate: Aboriginal Peoples in the Canadian Constitution

Author: 
Merrilee Rasmussen
Year: 
2002
Source: 
Paper prepared for www.righttocommunicate.org
Abstract: 
The author examines the right to communicate as a fundamental right of all human beings that is implicitly protected by provisions of the Canadian Constitution that recognize and affirm the existing Aboriginal and treaty rights of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada. The author argues that, as the primary objectives of the constitutional protection of Aboriginal and treaty rights are to preserve, protect, enhance and promote Aboriginal culture and identity and the survival of Aboriginal community, the individual's right to form that community is key. Such a right must be understood as implicitly protected, even though not explicitly enumerated.

Introduction

Some Essentials of the Right to Communicate

Author: 
L. S. Harms
Year: 
2002
Source: 
Invited paper prepared for www.righttocommunicate.org
Abstract: 
This article attempts to distill, from a wide range of activities and from diverse materials, the essentials of the right to communicate. The intent is to provide the newcomer a simple description of the right and to alert the researcher and educator to some of the tasks ahead.

Introduction

In late 1969, the EBU Review published an article by Jean d'Arcy entitled Communication satellites and the right of man to communicate. He wrote:

A New Beginning

Author: 
Desmond Fisher
Year: 
2002
Source: 
Invited paper prepared for www.righttocommunicate.org
Abstract: 
The author reviews the contributions of Jean d'Arcy to the development of the right to communicate, noting that the distinctive mark of the d'Arcy work was that it was based 'not on legislative but on ethical and sociological principles.' The several Unesco initiatives are chronicled, including the work of the MacBride Commission that 'put two-way communication at the centre of the new right.' He suggests several next steps including a new series of meetings to debate carefully key issues of the right including the emphasis on interaction and the means for guaranteeing this right. Finally, he raises the question of legitimate limitations that might be placed on the exercise of the right.

When Jean d'Arcy announced in 1969 that 'the time will come when the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) will have to encompass a more extensive right than man's right to information... This is the right of man to communicate', 1 he was launching an idea ahead of its time. He realised that the right to information enshrined in Article 19 of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights was not sufficient in itself to guarantee to human beings the freedom to communicate with each other in ways that their very human nature required.

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